Mets honored with keys to the city 50 years after their 1969 ‘miracle’ season

0
49


The New York Mets team was honored in Queens on Saturday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of their 1969 championship season.

The festivities started with a re-enactment of the 1969 World Series parade before Saturday’s game against the Atlanta Braves, led by Mr. and Mrs. Met. Many of the players rode in old-fashioned Ford convertibles behind them.


Former New York Met Ed Kranepool waves to fans during a parade to honor the 1969 Mets near Citi Field before a game against the Atlanta Braves on Saturday. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Later, members of the Miracle Mets — they included Jerry Koosman, Jerry Grote, Ron Swoboda, Art Shamsky and others — were given keys to the city during a pregame ceremony by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

‘THUMBS DOWN GUY’ LOOKING FOR HELP WITH MEDICAL BILLS AFTER EMERGENCY: ‘I CAME REALLY CLOSE TO DYING’

“It’s one of the most iconic teams in the history of baseball and I think we all appreciate how special that was,” Shamsky told WCBS Radio. “It’s just a great day and a great time for all of us.”

Met third baseman Ed Charles jumps with joy as pitcher Jerry Koosman and catcher Jerry Grote hug each other after the New York Mets downed the Baltimore Orioles, 5-3, in the fifth game of the World Series, Oct. 16, to take the championship title.

Met third baseman Ed Charles jumps with joy as pitcher Jerry Koosman and catcher Jerry Grote hug each other after the New York Mets downed the Baltimore Orioles, 5-3, in the fifth game of the World Series, Oct. 16, to take the championship title.
(Mets 1969 Getty Images)

Prior to the 1969 Mets team, the franchise was seen as losing one, having never won a championship. That improbable season changed the perception of the team, which morphed from laughingstock to winner.

The 1969 Mets leave the field after a pre-game ceremony to honor them before a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves on Saturday. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

The 1969 Mets leave the field after a pre-game ceremony to honor them before a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves on Saturday. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

One key Met who couldn’t make it was pitcher Tom Seaver, who is living outside the public eye since being diagnosed with dementia. His family announced back in March that he would not be making any more public appearances.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP



By David Aaro

Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here