Cancer mother given 9 months still alive 8 years later

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A mother-of-two given just nine months to live after her aggressive cancer spread throughout her body is still alive six years later because of a series of groundbreaking drugs.

Every time Michelle Amey’s disease advanced after her first diagnosis of skin cancer in 2010, a new drug became available to treat it.


In 2012, doctors secretly told Michelle’s husband Stuart, 41, that she did not have long left after tumours were discovered in her brain, liver and adrenal gland.

Her only option was to try a brand new drug – vemurafenib – which had not yet then been approved in the UK. 

Thanks to this and other successive developments in cancer therapy, the 41-year-old’s disease has been kept at bay.

The medications she has tried are now all potentially available on the NHS – they are  recommended by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) but individual CCGs have the final say.

Michelle Amey, from Dorset, was diagnosed with advanced skin cancer in 2010 – but it still alive 8 years on

Michelle Amey, from Dorset, was diagnosed with advanced skin cancer in 2010 – but it still alive 8 years on

The HR manager is pictured with  her husband Stuart and their sons Charlie and George

The HR manager is pictured with  her husband Stuart and their sons Charlie and George

The HR manager is pictured with her husband Stuart and their sons Charlie and George

Mrs Amey, from Mudeford, Dorset, said: ‘Unbeknown to me, because I didn’t ever want to know what my prognosis was, my husband Stuart had asked to know the reality of the situation.

‘He was told I had nine months to live and he kept that secret until very recently.

‘In my mind there was no option but to try the new drug. It wasn’t particularly pleasant to endure and I had some side effects but it worked amazingly well.’

‘She desperately wants to see our boys grow up’

Mr Amey found it incredibly tough being unable to share the terrifying prognosis with his wife.

He said: ‘It was such a shock to be told that news but then knowing Michelle didn’t want to know her prognosis made it particularly difficult for me.

‘I had to convince her that trying the new drug was absolutely the best and only thing to do, but without letting her suspect I knew more.

‘It was a tough few years until I eventually told her that. Of course it came as a massive shock to her too and it was very emotional.

Two years after her first diagnosis, the cancer had spread to her brain, liver and adrenal gland

Two years after her first diagnosis, the cancer had spread to her brain, liver and adrenal gland

Two years after her first diagnosis, the cancer had spread to her brain, liver and adrenal gland

‘The fact that the medical team were able to offer Michelle anything that kept her with us longer than those nine months was just amazing.

‘They know she desperately wants to see our boys grow up. We wouldn’t be able to cope without her. She’s an incredibly brave, stubborn, determined and amazing woman and we are enormously grateful.’

‘The shock hit me’ 

Mrs Amey, a HR manager, was originally diagnosed with advanced melanoma in 2007 after a pink mark on her right thigh, which contained a black dot, became raised and started to bleed.

Having seen her GP several times about the concerning mark, she was referred to see a specialist.

She said: ‘Naively I never thought about it being cancer and when he said the word the shock hit me – I remember my body just went numb.

‘My youngest son George was just three months old at the time, and Charlie wasn’t quite three years, and here I was being told I had cancer.’

Doctors secretly told her husband Stuart that she did not have long left after

Doctors secretly told her husband Stuart that she did not have long left after

Doctors secretly told her husband Stuart that she did not have long left after

Mrs Amey underwent surgery, but was then told in 2010 that the cancer had spread to her brain and adrenal gland.

Experts say that with brain tumours like Michelle’s the average life expectancy is just six weeks, but surgery to remove the biggest tumours proved effective – but then  was diagnosed with liver cancer in 2012.

Oblivious to her nine-month life expectancy, Michelle was given two options – to do nothing, or try vemurafenib, an enzyme inhibitor for treatment of late-stage melanoma.

At the time the drug had not been approved by health watchdog NICE but the professor treating her was head of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre at the University of Southampton and so had access to it.

She said: ‘As far as I was concerned I knew I had to do whatever it took. I was not going to give up on beating this and I still feel that way now.’

‘I am determined to carry on fighting’ 

Mrs Amey’s success with vemurafenib was limited, however, and in the summer of 2014 it was clear the drug had stopped working when signs of the cancer starting to re-appear.

And so Professor Christian Ottensmeier then treated her with groundbreaking immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab – which worked for two years.

Then in November 2016, when that stopped working, she began a combination of new drugs dabrafenib and trametinib, which she continues to take today.

The now 41 -year-old is thankful she was being treated by a leading university professor able to give her experimental drugs

The now 41 -year-old is thankful she was being treated by a leading university professor able to give her experimental drugs

The now 41 -year-old is thankful she was being treated by a leading university professor able to give her experimental drugs

Mrs Amey, whose sons are now 13 and 10, said: ‘I lost my aunt to melanoma in early 2000. At that point there was absolutely nothing they could do for her.

‘In 18 years this research has changed so much and I am so thankful.

‘My boys don’t know any different – they have grown up with mummy having cancer.

‘But I am here and able to watch them grow and enjoy precious family time with them and Stuart, who has just been amazing.

‘I do believe there is light at the end of the tunnel and I am determined to carry on fighting and never give up.’

‘Michelle is one of the very lucky people’ 

Mrs Amey, who will be supporting Cancer Research UK on World Cancer Day on February 4, thanked the charity for assisting in the progression of the life-saving drugs – just in time to help her as her cancer developed.

Professor Ottensmeier, who has been treating her at Southampton General Hospital since 2010, said: ‘Michelle is one of the very lucky people whose diagnosis has lagged only just behind the development and availability of new cancer treatments.

‘For us as a team, allowing a young mum to see her children grow up while she is also enjoying a good quality of life is a real privilege. 

‘It is unfortunately not something we get to see in all of our patients.

‘Michelle has had a remarkable response – and both she and Stuart are quite remarkable people in the way they have and continue to manage what is an awful situation.

‘For a person to present with the brain metastases that Michelle did, the median survival we would expect to see is around six weeks.

‘To be here all these years on talking about it, it is simply amazing.’

The groundwork for vemurafenib was laid in laboratory tests carried out by Cancer Research UK, which also helps fund clinical trials and research at the University of Southampton and its hospitals.





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